The North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center is a partnership between the US Geological Survey, the University of Colorado Boulder and five consortium partners. The NC CASC fosters innovative and applied research in support of tribal, federal, state, and local natural resource management and decision-making. The North Central center is one of nine regional climate centers in the national CASC network created to help meet the changing needs of land and resource managers across the country. It serves Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas and Nebraska. 

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News

NC CASC Webinar Series Webinar: Setting habitat protection and restoration priorities in a warming world: Lessons from Wyoming

Please join us for the NC CASC webinar on Thursday, December 9, 2021, 11a -12p MDT:  "Setting habitat protection and restoration priorities in a warming world: Lessons from Wyoming".  Presented by:  Molly Cross, Wildlife Conservation Society


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NC CASC Tribal Drought Webinar

Join us on Thursday, December 2nd at 1 PM MT for a Tribal Climate Webinar. The session will provide updates on drought in the Northern Great Plains and an outlook on what to expect for the winter and spring seasons.


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Spotlight: Tribal Climate Adaptation Planning

On October 18 – 21, 2021, participants from the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute and Ute Tribe of Utah came together in a virtual setting to attend the Tri Ute Climate Adaptation Workshop, the first in a series of four climate adaptation workshops funded by the BIA Tribal Climate Resilience Program


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Adaptation Framework Co-developed by CSP Senior Scientist Shelley Crausbay Highlighted in Special Section of High-Impact Journal "BioScience"

The work of NC CASC PI and CSP senior scientist Shelley Crausbay and colleagues is currently featured in a special issue of the high-impact journal BioScience. The publications also feature Amanda Cravens and Katie Clifford, two NC CASC project investigators.


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Christy Miller Hesed publishes new paper, "Using cultural consensus analysis to measure diversity in social-ecological knowledge for inclusive climate adaptation planning"

NC CASC Research Associate Christy Miller Hesed has published a new paper in the American Meteorological Society Journals, "Using cultur


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James Rattling Leaf to Present at Geo for Good Annual Conference

The Geo for Good Summit is an annual conference geared toward nonprofits, scientists, government agencies and other change-makers who want to leverage mapping tools and technology for positive impact


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Spotlight: Interactive and Easy to Use R-Shiny Apps

Read about the R-shiny apps developed by NC CASC's Dr. Imtiaz Rangwala and graduate student, Prasad Thota in the Spotlight Section on our home page.  


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Western Water Assessment Webinar: What’s up with the weather? A summer of extremes in the Intermountain West, featuring Seth Arens

Summer 2021 was a year of extreme weather events in the Intermountain West. Drought conditions that were building since 2019 covered vast areas of the region with extreme and exceptional drought.


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NW CASC Webinar: Tribal Experiences in Collaborative Fire Management in the Northwest

Our partners at the NW CASC are hosting a webinar, "Tribal Experiences in Collaborative Fire Management in the Northwest". In this last webinar of the series, you’ll hear from tribal representatives who work in a variety of roles related to fire stewardship, research and management.


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Spotlight

Spotlight: Tribal Climate Adaptation Planning

On October 18 – 21, 2021, participants from the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute and Ute Tribe of Utah came together in a virtual setting to attend the Tri Ute Climate Adaptation Workshop, the first in a series of four climate adaptation workshops funded by the BIA Tribal Climate Resilience Program. Ute Mountain Ute climate change coordinator, Margie Connolly, and NC CASC tribal liaison, Stefan Tangen, led and facilitated this 4-day online training workshop. NC CASC research ecologist, Brian Miller, also provided adaptation training while Doug Kluck from NOAA provided an opening presentation on climate change impacts.

As climate change impacts Tribal nations, the crafting and implementing of strategic adaptation plans help them to address specific vulnerabilities and determine courses of action based on the best information at hand. Incorporating the tribal context is particularly important to make climate information more relevant and valuable. These types of workshops “provide relevant information about climate change impacts and adaptation opportunities at the appropriate scale and scope” says Stefan Tangen, while also providing training on tools and resources already in place.

Goals of this virtual workshop included learning about the process of developing adaptation plans and creating space for building a community of practice of tribal resource managers to learn from each other, collaborate and develop relationships within and outside of each tribal nation. Participants received access to a “Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook”; training on how to determine and rank vulnerability as it pertains to risk assessment; access to an adaptation planning toolkit put together by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP); and information on how to engage their communities in climate action.

When asked if he thought the workshop was a success, Tangen says he believes so, as the reviews were positive, and comments were constructive on what could be improved in a virtual setting. During pandemic restrictions, “it’s critical to be flexible and adaptive by utilizing Zoom and other distance learning technologies, where appropriate, to make the information as accessible and useful as possible,”.

The next workshops will focus on drought monitoring and adaptation, climate summaries and dashboards, and incorporating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into climate change work. Participants expressed interest and enthusiasm for the remaining workshops, with several key participants expressing interest in pursuing climate adaptation planning at their respective tribes - a key metric of success according to Tangen.