NCCASC Projects

Status Topics Title Year
N/A A Climate Vulnerability Assessment Framework for Data-Poor Species Assessing the vulnerability of species to climate change is a key step in anticipating climate impacts on species. Vulnerability assessments characterize species’ future conservation needs and can guide current planning and management actions to… 2021
N/A Wildlife and Plants, Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Creating a North Central Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change (NC RISCC) Management Network Natural resource managers consistently identify invasive species as one of the biggest challenges for ecological adaptation to climate change. Yet climate change is often not considered during their management decision making. Given the many ways… 2020
In Progress Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Ecological Drought Across the Country Water resources are critical for ecosystems, agriculture, and communities, and potential climate impacts to hydrologic budgets and cycles are arguably the most consequential to society. Apart from precipitation, evapotranspiration makes up the most… 2021
In Progress Workshops for Facilitating Partnerships and Sharing Information The NC CASC hosts a variety of virtual and in-person workshops to build partnerships, collaborate and share information among the natural resources community including participants representing federal and state agency employees, university… 2021
In Progress Indigenous Peoples Support for Tribal Partners Tribal nations are priority science partners of the North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (NC CASC) and the center is committed to working with Tribal partners to create usable, and relevant science to build resilience to anthropogenic… 2021
In Progress Developing Products to Increase Climate Science Communication The NC CASC works to communicate the science conducted at the center out to the North Central region through a variety of communication resources such as state specific fact sheets, newsletters, social media and webinars. These… 2021
In Progress Science Tools for Managers Climate Science Support Platform The Climate Science Support Platform is a network of NC CASC scientists and partners that provides climate science support to the NC CASC community of scientists and stakeholders through collaborative research and integration of diverse science… 2021
In Progress Science Tools for Managers Training Future Climate Scientists and Researchers The NC CASC has conducted numerous training and skills development activities to support partners and researchers as they seek to use scientific information and techniques to understand and respond to climate change impacts. Training topics range… 2021
In Progress Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Future of Fire: Towards a National Synthesis of Wildland Fire Under a Changing Climate Abundant scientific research has characterized the relationships between climate and fire in ecosystems of the United States, and there is substantial evidence that the role of fire in ecosystems is likely to change with a changing climate. However… 2021
In Progress Water, Coasts and Ice, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Estimating Future High-Mountain Snowpack to Inform Terrestrial and Aquatic Species Status Assessments, Recovery Plans, and Monitoring One of the most visible signs of climate change is less mountain snow. In the Western U.S., deep snow has historically been a cornerstone of life for many plants and animals. For example, snow can provide denning shelter for certain species like the… 2021
In Progress Science Tools for Managers Climate Science and Adaptation Planning Support for State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAPs) in the North Central Region State Wildlife Action Plans are intended to provide proactive planning and guidance for the management of rare or imperiled species, including Species of Greatest Conservation Need. States must update their State Wildlife Action Plans every 10 years… 2021
In Progress Science Tools for Managers Supporting the National Park Service in Climate Adaptation Planning Natural and cultural resource managers across the country have begun to use a tool known as "scenario planning" to help prepare for climate change effects that may unfold in the future. In this process, scientific projections are used to… 2020
In Progress Landscapes, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Drought and Disturbances as Drivers of Long-Term Ecological Transformation and Risk Forested areas in the Western U.S. that are impacted by disturbances such as fire and drought have increased in recent decades. This trend is likely to continue, with the increase in frequency and extent of wildfire activity being especially… 2020
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather, Indigenous Peoples Determining Successful Management and Restoration Strategies for Pinyon-Juniper Communities in the Face of Changing Climate and Wildfire Pinyon-juniper woodlands are important ecosystems in the western U.S. that provide numerous critical environmental, economic, and cultural benefits. For example, pinyon pines are a significant cultural resource for multiple Native American Tribes… 2020
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Water, Coasts and Ice The Impact of Future Changes in Climate on Breeding Waterfowl Pairs in the US Prairie Pothole Region The Prairie Pothole Region is recognized as one of the most critical breeding habitats for waterfowl in North America and is used by an estimated 50–80 % of the continent’s breeding duck population. The ongoing acquisition program of the U.S. Fish… 2020
In Progress Indigenous Peoples, Landscapes, Wildlife and Plants Promoting Climate Resilience and Soil Health in Northern Rockies Grasslands Through Bison and Cattle Grazing Management: Weaving Together Indigenous and Western Science Native American tribes are interested in managing their homelands for future generations, using both Indigenous and western science to make decisions in culturally appropriate ways. In particular, there is interest in strategic… 2020
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Assessing the Vulnerability of Native Trout in the Northern Rockies: Linking Science and Management for Climate Adaptation Trout are one of the most culturally, economically, and ecologically important groups of freshwater fishes in the Rocky Mountain region. However, human impacts and climate change are significantly altering freshwater… 2020
In Progress Landscapes, Science Tools for Managers, Wildlife and Plants, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Science to Inform Post-fire Conifer Regeneration and Reforestation Strategies Under Changing Climate Conditions Climate change is causing an increase in the amount of forested area burned by wildfires in the western U.S. The warm, dry post-fire conditions of the region may limit tree… 2020
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Science Tools for Managers, Indigenous Peoples Exploring the Past to Plan for the Future: Integrating Indigenous Knowledge and Paleoperspectives to Inform Climate Change Adaptation Tribal resource managers in the southwest U.S. are facing a host of challenges related to environmental change, including increasing temperatures, longer periods of drought, and invasive species. These threats are exacerbating the… 2020
In Progress North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center Consortium - Hosted by The University of Colorado Boulder (2018-2023) The NC CASC supports co-produced actionable science, data-intensive discovery, and open science to support tribal, federal, state, and local natural resource managers and decision-makers in the North Central region, which serves Colorado, Wyoming,… 2020
In Progress Indigenous Peoples Synthesis of CASC-Led Climate Training Activities for Tribes and Indigenous Communities The Climate Adaptation Science Centers have conducted numerous training and skills development activities to support tribal and indigenous partners as they seek to use scientific information and techniques to understand and respond to climate change… 2019
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Strategies for Reducing the Vulnerability of Grassland Birds to Climate Change within the Central Flyway Prairies were once widespread across North America, but are now one of the most endangered and least protected ecosystems in the world. Agriculture and residential development have reduced once extensive prairies into a patchwork of remnant prairies… 2019
In Progress Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather State of the Science Synthesis on Transformational Drought: Understanding Drought’s Potential to Transform Ecosystems Across the Country Drought events have cost the U.S. nearly $245 billion since 1980, with costs ranging from $2 to $44 billion in any given year. However, these socio-economic losses are not the only impacts of drought. Ecosystems, fish, wildlife, and plants also… 2019
In Progress Landscapes, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Anticipating Forest Vulnerability to Fire-Catalyzed Ecosystem Change in the Northern Rocky Mountains Forests in the western U.S. are increasingly impacted by climate change. Warmer and drier conditions both increase fire activity in western forests and make it more difficult for forests to recover after wildfires. If forests fail to recover, they… 2019
In Progress Landscapes, Science Tools for Managers, Indigenous Peoples Synthesis of Climate Impacts and Adaptation on Grassland Ecosystems in the Northern Great Plains Grasslands in the northern Great Plains are important ecosystems that support local economies, tribal communities, livestock grazing, diverse plant and animal communities, and large-scale migrations of big game ungulates, grassland birds, and… 2019
In Progress Science Tools for Managers Approaches to Evaluate Actionable Science for Climate Adaptation Science produced by the National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Center (CASC) network must ideally be scientifically sound, relevant to a management decision, fair and respectful of stakeholders’ divergent values, and produced through a… 2019
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Science Tools for Managers Understanding Local Resistance and Resilience to Future Habitat Change in the Sagebrush Ecosystem The sagebrush ecosystem is home to diverse wildlife, including big-game and Greater sage-grouse. Historic and contemporary land-uses, large wildfires, exotic plant invasion, and woodland expansion all represent threats to this multiple-use landscape… 2019
In Progress Landscapes, Science Tools for Managers Integrating Climate Considerations into Grazing Management Programs in National Parks The National Park Service (NPS) is responsible for managing livestock grazing in 94 units, and several park grazing management planning efforts are currently underway. However, there is a recognized need to update grazing management practices to… 2019
In Progress Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Developing and Testing a Rapid Assessment Method for Understanding Key Social Factors of Ecological Drought Preparedness Drought is a complex environmental hazard that impacts both ecological and social systems. Accounting for the role of human attitudes, institutions, and societal values in drought planning is important to help identify how various drought durations… 2019
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Synthesizing Climate Change Impacts on Wildlife Health and Identifying Adaptation Strategies Changing climate conditions could have significant impacts on wildlife health. Shifts in temperature and precipitation may directly affect the occurrence of disease in fish and wildlife by altering their interactions with pathogens (such as the… 2018
In Progress Water, Coasts and Ice Understanding Historical and Predicting Future Lake Temperatures in North and South Dakota Lakes, reservoirs, and ponds are central and integral features of the North Central U.S. These water bodies provide aesthetic, cultural, and ecosystem services to surrounding wildlife and human communities. External impacts – such as climate change… 2018
In Progress Water, Coasts and Ice, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Characterizing Historic Streamflow to Support Drought Planning in the Upper Missouri River Basin The Missouri River system is the life-blood of the American Midwest, providing critical water resources that drive the region’s agriculture, industry, hydroelectric power generation, and ecosystems. The basin has a long history of development and… 2018
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Predicting Future Forage Conditions for Elk and Mule Deer in Montana and Wyoming Improving the quality of habitat for western big-game species, such as elk and mule deer, was identified as a priority by the Department of the Interior in 2018. Maintaining healthy herds not only supports the ecosystems where these species are… 2018
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Enabling Climate-Informed Planning and Decisions about Species of Conservation Concern in the North Central Region: Phase 2 Changing climate conditions such as increasing droughts, floods, and wildfires, hotter temperatures, declining snowpacks, and changes in the timing of seasonal events are already having an impact on wildlife and their habitats. In order to make… 2018
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes Mapping the Risk of Ecological Transformation Across Pinyon Woodlands and the U.S. West Pinyon pine woodlands are among the most widespread and iconic vegetation types in the western United States and support recreation, resource extraction, grazing, and cultural enrichment. However, severe drought conditions have recently… 2018
In Progress Wildlife and Plants, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Big Sagebrush Response to Wildfire and Invasive Grasses in the 21st Century Big sagebrush plant communities are important and widespread in western North America and are crucial for meeting long-term conservation goals for greater sage-grouse and other wildlife of conservation concern. Yet wildfire is increasing in the West… 2018
In Progress Wildlife and Plants Improving Projections of Wildlife and Landscapes for Natural Resource Managers Managing natural resources is fraught with uncertainties around how complex social-ecological systems will respond to management actions and other forces, such as climate. Modeling tools have emerged to help grapple with different aspects of this… 2018
Completed Science Tools for Managers, Landscapes Incorporating USGS Web Cameras into the Phenocam Network to Enhance Scientific Understanding of Phenological Trends and Variability The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) and the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) seek to enhance scientific understanding of how climate trends and variability are linked to phenology across spatial scales, with the ultimate goal… 2020
Completed Indigenous Peoples Support for the 2019 Tribal Climate Camp The 2019 Tribal Climate Camp, hosted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, took place June 16-21, 2019 at the Flathead Lake Biological Station in Polson, Montana. The Tribal Climate Camp was designed to support teams of tribal leaders,… 2019
Completed Science Tools for Managers Open-Source and Open-Workflow Climate Futures Toolbox for Adaptation Planning Global climate models are a key source of climate information and produce large amounts of spatially explicit data for various physical parameters. However, these projections have substantial uncertainties associated with them, and the datasets… 2019
Completed Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather How and Why Upper Colorado River Basin Land, Water, and Fire Managers Choose to Use Drought Tools Preparing for and responding to drought requires integrating scientific information into complex decision making processes. In recognition of this challenge, regional drought early warning systems (DEWS) and related drought-information tools have… 2018
Completed Science Tools for Managers Refining Guidance for Incorporating Climate Science and Scenario Planning into National Park Service Resource Stewardship Strategies One of the biggest challenges facing resource managers today is not knowing exactly when, where, or how climate change effects will unfold. To help federal land managers address this need, the North Central CASC has been working with the National… 2018
Completed Indigenous Peoples Supporting Tribal Climate Adaptation in the Northern Rockies and Northern Plains Region Tribes and tribal lands in the Northern Rockies/Northern Plains region are already experiencing the effects of climate change, and tribal managers are also already responding to and preparing for the impacts of those changes. However, these managers… 2018
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes Supporting the National Park Service Midwest Region Bison Management Plan The bison, which has long served as the symbol of the Department of the Interior, became the official national mammal of the United States in 2016. Bison played a key role in shaping the grasslands of the Great Plains for millennia, but today they… 2018
Completed Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Identifying Characteristics of Actionable Science for Drought Planning and Adaptation Changing climate conditions can make water management planning and drought preparedness decisions more complicated than ever before. Resource managers can no longer rely solely on historical data and trends to base their actions, and are in need of… 2018
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Water, Coasts and Ice Climate-Driven Shifts in Prairie Pothole Wetlands: Assessing Future Impacts to Critical Waterfowl Habitats The North American Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is an expansive region that covers parts of five Midwestern states and three Canadian provinces. This region contains millions of wetlands in which waterfowl breed and from which 50-80% of the… 2018
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Improving the Success of Post-Fire Adaptive Management Strategies in Sagebrush Steppe Sagebrush steppe is one of the most widely distributed ecosystems in North America. Found in eleven western states, this important yet fragile ecosystem is dominated by sagebrush, but also contains a diversity of native shrubs, grasses, and… 2018
Completed Landscapes Ecology and Management of Pinyon-Juniper Woodlands: State of the Science Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major part of western landscapes and are valued for recreational use, cultural resources, watershed protection, and wildlife habitats. These woodlands have been identified by several stakeholders, including natural… 2017
Completed Science Tools for Managers Informing Climate Change Adaptation Planning in National Parks One of the biggest challenges facing resource managers today is not knowing exactly when, where, or how climate change effects will unfold. In order to plan for this uncertain future, managers have begun to use a tool known as scenario planning, in… 2017
Completed Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Foundational Science Area: Ecological Drought, Climate Extremes, and the Water Cycle in the North Central U.S. In the North Central U.S., drought is a dominant driver of ecological, economic, and social stress. Drought conditions have occurred in the region due to lower precipitation, extended periods of high temperatures and evaporative demand, or a… 2017
Completed Science Tools for Managers Foundational Science Area: Maximizing Stakeholder Engagement to Support Climate Adaptation in the North Central U.S. In the North Central U.S., the rate and extent of changing climate conditions has been increasing in recent decades. These changes include shifting precipitation patterns, warming temperatures, and more frequent extreme events, such as droughts and… 2017
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes Foundational Science Area: Climate Adaptation Strategies for Wildlife and Habitats in the North Central U.S. Researchers with the North Central Climate Science Center have made substantial progress in assessing the impacts of climate and land use change on wildlife and ecosystems across the region. Building on this progress, researchers will work with… 2017
Completed Science Tools for Managers Enabling Climate-Informed Planning and Decisions about Species of Conservation Concern in the North Central Region: Phase 1 The goal of this project was to identify climate-related scientific information needs in the North Central region that will support the management of key species and help avoid species declines. Researchers worked closely with state fish and… 2017
Completed Science Tools for Managers Building Social and Ecological Resilience to Climate Change in Southwestern Colorado: Phase 2 In southwestern Colorado, land managers anticipate the impacts of climate change to include higher temperatures, more frequent and prolonged drought, accelerated snowmelt, larger and more intense fires, more extreme storms, and the spread of… 2017
Completed Building Collaboration between the North Central CSC and Regional Partners Through Liaison Teams The North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) is committed to bringing the best possible climate science to bear in order to inform decisions made by Department of the Interior (DOI) planners and other land and resource managers across the… 2017
Completed Indigenous Peoples Continued Capacity Building in the North-Central U.S.: Tribal Engagement and PhenoCam Analysis Climate change is poised to alter natural systems, the frequency of extreme weather, and human health and livelihoods. In order to effectively prepare for and respond to these challenges in the north-central region of the U.S., people must have the… 2015
Completed Landscapes, Wildlife and Plants Forecasting Future Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Covering 120 million acres across 14 western states and 3 Canadian provinces, sagebrush provides critical habitat for species such as pronghorn, mule deer, and sage-grouse – a species of conservation concern. The future of these and other species is… 2015
Completed Science Tools for Managers Model-Based Scenario Planning to Inform Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains One of the biggest challenges facing resource managers today is not knowing exactly when, where, and how climate change effects will unfold. While models can be used to predict the types of impacts that climate change might have on a landscape,… 2015
Completed Indigenous Peoples, Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather The Wind River Indian Reservation’s Vulnerability to the Impacts of Drought and the Development of Decision Tools to Support Drought Preparedness The Wind River Indian Reservation in west-central Wyoming is home to the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes, who reside near and depend on water from the streams that feed into the Wind River. In recent years, however, the region has… 2015
Completed Landscapes, Science Tools for Managers Informing the Identification of Economically Effective Targets for Grassland Conservation in the Dakotas The conversion of grassland to cropland in the Dakotas could imperil wildlife such as nesting waterfowl and contribute to the degradation of water quality in the Mississippi River watershed. However, high crop prices in recent years have contributed… 2015
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes Informing Adaptation Strategies for Maintaining Landscape Connectivity for Northern Rockies Wildlife The U.S. Northern Rocky Mountains support a large number of native wildlife species, and survival of these populations depends on connected landscapes to support current migration and dispersal, as well as future shifts in species’ ranges. However,… 2015
Completed Science Tools for Managers, Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Foundational Science Area: Helping People and Nature Adapt to Climate Change in the North Central U.S. The north-central region of the U.S. has experienced a series of extreme droughts in recent years, with impacts felt across a range of sectors. For example, the impacts of a 2002 drought are estimated to have resulted in a $3 billion loss to the… 2014
Completed Landscapes Foundational Science Area: Assessing Climate Change Impacts to Wildlife and Habitats in the North Central U.S. In the North Central U.S., temperatures are rising and precipitation patterns are changing, with consequences ranging from more frequent and severe wildfires to prolonged drought to widespread forest pest outbreaks. As a result, land managers are… 2014
Completed Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Foundational Science Area: Developing Climate Change Understanding and Resources for Adaptation in the North Central U.S. In the North Central U.S., drought is a dominant driver of ecological, economic, and social stress. Drought conditions have occurred in the region due to lower precipitation, extended periods of high temperatures and evaporative demand, or a… 2014
Completed Indigenous Peoples, Science Tools for Managers Capacity Building in the North-Central U.S.: Tribal Engagement, Climate Training, and PhenoCam Deployment Climate change is poised to alter natural systems, the frequency of extreme weather, and human health and livelihoods. In order to effectively prepare for and respond to these challenges in the north-central region of the U.S., people must have the… 2013
Completed Foundational Science Area Activities (FY2013) Through its Foundational Science Area (FSA) activities, the North Central Climate Science Center (CSC) aims to provide relevant and usable climate information to decision-makers and natural resource managers, so that they can better manage their… 2013
Completed Science Tools for Managers Building Social and Ecological Resilience to Climate Change in Southwestern Colorado: Phase 1 Southwestern Colorado is already experiencing the effects of climate change in the form of larger and more severe wildfires, prolonged drought, and earlier snowmelt. Climate scientists expect the region to experience more summer heat waves, longer-… 2013
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Science Tools for Managers Science and Forecasting to Inform Implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee’s Whitebark Pine Management Strategy The goal of this project was to inform implementation of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) Whitebark Pine (WBP) subcommittee’s “WBP Strategy” based on climate science and ecological forecasting. Project objectives were… 2013
Completed Water, Coasts and Ice Developing a VisTrails Platform for Modeling Streamflow Hydrology and Projecting Climate Change Effects on Streamflow Hydrologic models are used throughout the world to forecast and simulate streamflow, inform water management, municipal planning, and ecosystem conservation, and investigate potential effects of climate and land-use change on hydrology. The USGS… 2013
Completed Science Tools for Managers Evaluating Data Needs and Capacity in the North Central Region and Coordinating an Assessment of Regional Climate Impacts A central goal of the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) is to bring together the latest data, tools, and knowledge on the impacts of climate change to the hands of the region’s natural and cultural resource managers. To meet this goal,… 2013
Completed Wildlife and Plants Science to Support an Assessment of Future Climate Impacts on Wildlife in Wyoming In response to the potential impacts of climate and land use change to the Nation’s ecosystems, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) launched a series of Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) in 2010. The REAs are focused on improving our… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Incorporating Adaptive Capacity into Decision-Making in the North Central U.S. Managers already face uncertainty when making decisions about how to best manage natural resources. Now, climate change is adding an additional level of complexity to resource management decisions. Understanding the ability of human and ecological… 2012
Completed Wildlife and Plants Assessing the Vulnerability of Vegetation to Future Climate in the North Central U.S. Determining which species, habitats, or ecosystems are most vulnerable to climate change enables resource managers to better set priorities for conservation action. To address the need for information on vulnerability, this research project aimed to… 2012
Completed Drought, Fire and Extreme Weather Understanding Extreme Climate Events in the North Central U.S. The climate of the North Central U.S. is driven by a combination of factors, including atmospheric circulation patterns, the region’s complex topography which extends from the High Rockies to the Great Plains, and variations in hydrology. Together,… 2012
Completed Regional Short- and Long-term Climate Impacts on Northern Rocky Mountain and Great Plains Ecosystems With joint funding from the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) and NASA's Earth Science Applied Sciences Program, the NC CSC supports resource managers and their decision process through its Resource for Vulnerability… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Bringing Together Scientists and Resource Managers to Assess Science Needs and Address Questions Related to Conservation in a Changing Climate Climate scientists need more and better information about the needs of decision-makers and managers, while decision-makers need better information about how a changing climate may affect their management and conservation objectives. The goal of this… 2012
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Science Tools for Managers Integrating Climate and Biological Data into Management Decisions for the Greater Sage-­Grouse and their Habitats Climate affects both the demographics of the Greater sage-grouse bird and the condition and long-term viability of their habitats, including sage-steppe communities. This project builds on collaboration among federal land managers, state… 2012
Completed Wildlife and Plants, Landscapes, Water, Coasts and Ice Projecting Future Climate Effects on Cottonwood and Willow Seed Dispersal and Tree Regeneration in Western Riparian Forests Throughout western North America, warming associated with climate change is leading to both earlier spring peak streamflows and earlier seed dispersal, potentially reducing seedling establishment and in turn reducing the quality of riparian (near-… 2012
Completed Landscapes Projecting the Future Encroachment of Woody Vegetation into Grasslands of the Northern Great Plains by Simulating Climate Conditions and Possible Management Actions Maintaining the native prairie lands of the Northern Great Plains (NGP), which provide an important habitat for declining grassland species, requires anticipating the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and climate… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Potential Climate Impacts and Adaptation Strategies in the Great Plains In the Great Plains, climate change is expected to result in more frequent and intense droughts, severe rainfall events, and heat waves. Adapting to changing conditions will require coordination in the research and observation capabilities of… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Data Integration for Landscape Conservation Workshop Colorado State University organized and hosted a workshop aimed at developing an information technology framework for data integration related to climate change impacts on ecosystems and landscape conservation. The workshop included key federal and… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Assessment of Data Integration Capacity The North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) involved federal, state, tribal, and university partners to implement a pilot study aimed at developing data and information exchange protocols and identifying analytical needs across a broad network… 2012
Completed Science Tools for Managers Using a Collaborative Modeling Approach to Explore Climate and Landscape Change in the Northern Rockies and Inform Adaptive Management Federal land managers need an adaptive management framework to accommodate changing conditions and that allows them to effectively link the appropriate science to natural resource management decision-making across jurisdictional boundaries.&nbsp… 2012